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Corporate Asset Management Plan

The City’s Corporate Asset Management Plan is a long-term plan developed to manage infrastructure while ensuring that the City’s assets are capable of meeting the levels of service required to support the City of Saskatoon’s goals.  The overarching Corporate Asset Management Plan will guide future funding and assist in the stewardship of assets and delivery of services.

There will be eight major asset categories to begin with but the City’s goal over the next few years is to have a full asset management plan that encompasses all assets that the City owns. 

  • Buildings and Facilities                     
  • Roads and Sidewalks
  • Bridges and Overpasses
  • Parks
  • Vehicles and Equipment
  • Transit
  • Water, Wastewater and Storm Water
  • Electrical Utility

As each individual Asset Management Plan is developed for each of the key asset categories, they will be added below along with the corresponding Administrative Report.

Corporate Asset Management Plan Report 

 Administrative Report: Corporate Asset Management Plan

To note: Attachment 1. Investing in the Road(s) to Continued Prosperity (completed in 2013), and Attachment 2. Building Better Infrastructure: Water & Wastewater Systems (completed in 2015) are included with the Corporate Asset Management Plan report for reference – they serve as examples of recently completed asset management plans.

A Water and Wastewater Systems asset management plan (Building Better Infrastructure: Water & Wastewater Systems) was completed in 2015.

In 2013, a Roadways asset management plan (Investing in the Road(s) to Continued Prosperity) was completed. It will be updated in 2016.  

 Investing in the Road(s) to Continued Prosperity

 

Corporate Asset Management Plan: Frequently Asked Questions

1.  Why is the City of Saskatoon completing Asset Management Plans?

The City’s Asset Management Plans are long-term plans developed to manage infrastructure while ensuring that the assets are capable of meeting the levels of service required to support the City of Saskatoon’s goals. 

The overarching Corporate Asset Management Plan will guide future funding and assist in the stewardship of assets and delivery of services by:

providing sufficient information to make informed and balanced decisions;
ensuring the required levels of services are provided in a cost-effective manner over the assets life;
ensuring maximum benefit is received from the assets; and
helping to manage risks to the delivery of the services (risk of asset failure).

Asset management plans are required for higher levels of government funding and reporting.  As an example, the renewed Gas Tax Fund, effective April 1, 2014, requires that the City make progress towards developing and/or implementing an asset management plan.

 

2.  How many Asset Management Plans is the City Planning for?

There will be eight major asset categories to begin with but our goal over the next few years is to have a full asset management plan that encompasses all assets that the City owns.

There will be eight major asset categories addressed in the Corporate Asset Management Plan:

  • Buildings and Facilities
  • Roads and Sidewalks
  • Bridges and Overpasses
  • Parks
  • Vehicles and Equipment
  • Transit
  • Water, Wastewater and Storm Water
  • Electrical Utility

 

3.  What will be included in the City’s Asset Management Plans?

The Asset Management Plans will focus on four main questions:

  • What does the City own and what is it worth?
  • What is the current condition assessment?
  • What is the desired condition?
  • What is the funding gap required to reach the desired condition?

The content contained in each individual asset management plan will be slightly different depending on the asset class. Although the level of service and condition level for each type of asset is defined differently, an expenditure funding level will be identified in order to address any potential service level gaps.

City Council will have the ability to select a desired condition rating (such as age of transit fleet or number of water main breaks over 25 years) as well as an expenditure level to address any gaps between the current and desired condition.

 

4.  How many Asset Management Plans have been completed to date?

A Water and Wastewater Systems asset management plan (Building Better Infrastructure: Water & Wastewater Systems) was completed in 2015.

In 2013, a Roadways asset management plan (Investing in the Road(s) to Continued Prosperity) was completed. It will be updated in 2016. 

To note: Attachment 1. Investing in the Road(s) to Continued Prosperity (completed in 2013), and Attachment 2. Building Better Infrastructure: Water & Wastewater Systems

(completed in 2015) are included with the Corporate Asset Management Plan report for reference – serving as examples of recently completed asset management plans.

All new individual asset management plans will be referred to as:

Asset Management Plan: 2016 Roadways, or Asset Management Plan: 2016 Water & Waste Water Management.

 

5.  Do the eight major asset categories include all the assets the City owns?

No. The City owns more assets such as information technology assets (hardware & software), land, furniture and fixtures.  Over the next 2-3 years, Administrations’ goal is to have individual asset management plans created for all assets owned by the City. 

Within the eight major asset categories planned for 2016, there are smaller asset classes, called sub-classes, which may not be included in the first individual asset management plan.  The plans will focus on the larger assets within the categories.  For example, the Parks Asset Management Plan will not include fencing or park signage on the first report, but as the plans are updated, all assets will be included.

 

6.  Will the Asset Management Plans include funding gaps?

Yes they will. The plans will include the funding gap to reach the desired expenditure level.

The Asset Management Plans will be presented to City Council with a recommendation that the information be received and that the matter be considered during the City’s annual Budget Review process, next for 2017.  This will ensure that City Council has complete information when making decisions on how to fund the rehabilitation and maintenance of the City’s assets. 

 

7. How do the Asset Management Plans relate to the Civic Services Survey completed in 2015?

Respondents to the Civic Services Survey identified road and sidewalk repair as the most important issue facing the City and felt that more resources should be allocated towards road maintenance.

Respondents also identified key strengths in the survey including:

  • the quality of the drinking water,
  • repair of water main breaks, and
  • treatment of sewage. 

All of these civic services need reliable and well-maintained assets to meet the needs of the citizens that the City serves.  The quality of the services provided is directly related to the condition of the assets.  The City’s Asset Management Plans will help to identify and address the gaps in funding that exist between the costs of maintaining or replacing assets - and the funding that exists for those assets.  It will then allow prioritization of the City’s limited funding to be directed to key, priority service areas.  

 

8.  How do Asset Management Plans support the City’s Strategic Goals?

The Corporate Asset Management Plan as well as the individual asset management plans support the Strategic Goal of Asset and Financial Sustainability, and the 4-year priority to establish levels of service for rehabilitation of assets and identify supporting financial strategies. The plans also support the longer 10-year strategy to adopt and implement a corporate-wide asset management and rehabilitation philosophy.

 

Building Better Infrastructure: Water & Wasterwater Systems